The diagnosis…

I went to the podiatrist today and learned that I have a neuroma. A neuroma (according to Mayoclinic.com) is:

A neuroma is a noncancerous (benign) growth of nerve tissue that can develop in various parts of your body. Morton’s neuroma occurs in a nerve in your foot, often between your third and fourth toes. The condition involves a thickening of the tissue around one of the nerves leading to your toes. Morton’s neuroma causes a sharp, burning pain in the ball of your foot. Your toes also may sting, burn or feel numb.

Also called plantar neuroma or intermetatarsal neuroma, Morton’s neuroma may occur in response to irritation, injury or pressure. Morton’s neuroma may also occur for unknown reasons.

Common treatments for Morton’s neuroma include changing footwear or using arch supports. Sometimes, corticosteroid injections or surgery may be necessary.

mortons-neuroma

The red shaded area in the picture above is exactly where my pain is. It is VERY painful after about an hour of running or walking fast. It is almost like clockwork that the pain starts. That was not good for my upcoming 10K that I am anticipating taking 1 hour and 15 minutes (if everything goes well).

The diagnosis seemed pretty easy (assuming the doctor is correct).  He just did a physical exam of my foot and found the nerve. Apparently that is a common way to find it. Again, the Mayoclinic.com says diagnosis is usually:

Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and examine your foot. Because there’s typically no outward sign of Morton’s neuroma, your doctor will try to find a palpable, tender mass. There may also be a feeling of “clicking” between the bones of your foot. Your doctor may order an X-ray of your foot to rule out other foot problems.

I felt the “clicking” that is described above.

After some discussion he gave me a cortisone shot

Corticosteroid injections. Steroids are medications that reduce inflammation. An injection of a corticosteroid medication in the area of the neuroma may reduce pain. However, overuse of injected steroids can lead to a number of side effects, including weight gain and high blood pressure, so people usually receive only a limited number of injections.

OK, so hopefully he didn’t give me enough that will cause weight gain!!! It was a tiny needle – it didn’t look like a lot! I hardly felt anything at .all

This picture illustrates exactly how I received my injection:

injection

The injection along with proper footwear is supposed to have an 80% success rate in pain reduction. I think my running shoes are pretty good, but I am going to see if they come in “wide” and try them to see if that helps, too.

The shoe I am currently wearing is the Supernova Sequence and I just found that they do come in wide! I will order a pair tomorrow. Hopefully they will be in stock.

supernovaThe down side of today is now I missed a day of training. I really need to get all my workouts in this week for my weightloss and my race on Saturday. Brian gave me my schedule tonight and it is tailored for me to run my 5K Saturday in under 35 minutes (thank you). I will have to maintain a 11:30 min pace. I am pretty sure I will be able to do it.

So, back to my foot. Right now it feels weird. It is a bit swollen and I have no feeling in my toes. Hopefully that will be gone by tomorrow so I can get back into my workouts!

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3 Comments

  1. Ted

    A neuroma? You don’t need that. You’re on a roll. I hope the injections work for you as far as relieving pain. Will that shot hold you through the Saturday race?

  2. Linda

    Poor girl! Hope the shot helps!

    You are taking after your dad in putting illustrations in, but that is good it helps to see what you are explaining.

  3. lauraph2009

    Hi! The doctor said that if the shot works I shouldn’t need another one – this should fix the problem. If it doesn’t we will look in to getting orthodics for my shoes. My foot feels normal today. I will run for the first time at the track tomorrow.

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